Nine Easy Ways to Make Chess Fun

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35 Comments

  1. Chess is definitely better enjoyed if losing can be both interesting and motivating to you. I think it requires a certain competitiveness to enjoy the game, without that, there are momentary puzzles to solve but I would agree that it's a bit of a slog.

  2. Absorption chess. You gain the power of the peice you capture. I cant find a place to buy the pieces for it.

  3. As kids my brother and I loved a chess variant dad taught us called suicide. Basically its the exact opposite of chess in that you're trying to get your pieces taken and if you can take, you must take. Winner was the first to lose all their pieces if I recall correctly. Basically the idea is to help you learn the moves and threat zones of the various pieces.

  4. Chess960 is to me the way chess should be always played
    I'm just not a fan of the arbitrary castling method where your king and rook end up in the same place as standard rules, so if your opponent agrees, just make castling "rook moves to king, king jumps over" and voila.

  5. "Losers Chess" is a nice twist if you're looking for something less "serious".
    *If a player can take a piece, they must
    *King is a regular piece
    *First one to lose all pieces wins

    Or something along those lines, house rules are always fine since the point is to have fun.

  6. I wouldn't call myself a chess snob by any means (I'm about as beginner as it gets and everyone should enjoy the game as they please)… but I hate to admit that seeing that he'd made his knight (and only one of them) look away from the board at 2:30 just…. bothered me.

  7. I suddenly realized you said "chess is bad because checkmate exists" and then presented variant after variant that have checkmates

  8. I am a fairly poor chess player and I don't play it very frequently either, but even so the comments about chess here seem like quite weak arguments.

    For example, the point is raised that if players are not evenly matched the less skilled player is likely to lose badly and may not have fun. That's probably true, but that's true of almost all games. There are some games which try to mitigate differences in skill to some degree, but unless they go so far as to altogether remove skill (e.g., an old style roll and move game), a significant mismatch in player skill is often or usually going to have a similar outcome.

    But even accounting for those games where player skill is mitigated by the game, I don't see these as an improvement. At least for me personally, I'd much, much, much rather lose horribly in a game where that massive difference in outcome was the result of things entirely in my control, than to lose horribly or even just barely in a game where the difference came down to whatever random element (e.g., poor card draws) which are supposed to mitigate skill. Now that doesn't mean I don't like modern designer board games – I do, and I play them much, much more often than I play chess. Still, getting stomped in chess feels much better to me than losing by one point in, say, Viticulture (a game I very much like) after having drawn the wrong color grape 4 turns in a row.

    And I think this is ultimately the biggest thing that frustrates me about the comments here: they seem like they're much, much more a matter of personal preference but, at least to me, they seem to be presented as objective fact*. The sorts of experiences or feelings about playing a game of chess that are presented here are *entirely legitimate for a person to feel. Like so many other things in this world, not everyone is going to like every thing, and that's not only okay, it's part of what makes the world so interesting! The way they came across in the video, though, was – again, at least to me – as though they were objective, universal truths about Chess.

  9. 14min video, straight up 7min of useless rambling, first time I press the skip thing so much.

  10. "…weighing our chessticles…"
    CLASSIC!
    I love these guys.

  11. honestly surprised how few dislikes this video has lmaoooooo

  12. My favourite variant is something me and a friend created called Defector's Chess, where after a certain amount of either moves or time, the players switch sides (We used D6 turns for each player) so you can't just murder everything, as you'll be playing as that side soon.

  13. You should do a video about Shogi (Japanese Chess) in the same spirit of this review or the Go review. I dont like Chess, but i played some matches and found it fun, would be interesting to see what you guys think

  14. There's also Chess Evolved Online on Steam, where you can customize your army with various unlockable pieces with magical powers, CCG-style

  15. horde chess, or as we call it here, zombie chess, is really fun. when you allow white pawns to move sideways, this game is surprisingly equal

  16. The first variant, peasant revolt, doesnt seem very casual. Mating with knight and bishop is one of the most difficult mates. I dont think even intermediate level players really know how to do it.

  17. Nightmare chess combined with
    4-way chess was one of my favorite games as a kid

  18. I liked your stupid video and if we played real chess I would break you

  19. There are so many more interesting chess variants than that one that happened to travel to the west. What about chinese chess, korean chess and my favorite: Shogi. The 9×9 variant is the most played and popular version, and for good reasons: it is sharper (games rarely end in a draw), more dynamic (multiple simultaneous battles on the board, win/lose can quickly change) and balanced (material versus position) than "international chess" . There also is 'Tori Shogi' on a 7×7 board and a huge version that is played on a 25 x 25 board (just setting up the pieces would taka a couple hours, I presume…) if you fancy that… 😉

  20. I think my favorite variants of chess are 1) shogi and 2) crazyhouse chess. Crazyhouse is basically 1v1 bughouse, where when you capture an opponent's piece, you add it to your own reserves and can drop it on the board, barring some restrictions. There's also the classic chess960, which randomizes the rear line units, three-check chess, where the first person to go into check three times loses, and antichess/losing chess/misere chess, where the win condition is losing!

  21. This guy is a fucking goofball, cringe af bruv, get good

  22. Where'd the board and pieces come from? Looking on Amazon and I haven't seen any pieces that seem to look as nice as the ones you have in the video.

  23. (Dobutsu) Shogi in the Greenwood. That is all. It's better than biscuits. I cannot believe Shut Up Sit Down have not reviewed it. Chess with a spawning ability, Chicks with special powers. Giraffes, cats, dogs that stay with their owner, Wild boars that can only charge in a straight line… Who knew that a game slightly more complex than Chess would do away with an entry bar? Well, that is, if you are friends with Ebay. This is Shogi Baby!

  24. For guys the poop on chess quite a lot, that's an expensive set you've got there Quins. Hmmm maybe you don't hate chess as much as you say.

  25. I was interested in the game variants but my brain crashed when I heard about a skateboardist popping a wheelie…

  26. New pieces
    New boards
    Draft Mechanic
    New obstacles on the board

    -Why has no one done this or even suggested this? 'Especially with online chess.
    Toss in instants and sorceries as well.

  27. Another fun digital variant on the same level of fun as 5d Chess is Chess Evolved Online.
    It's like Chess, but your side of the chess board is actually a ccg deck (akin to Warhammer)

  28. Try Doubutsu Shogi, its a surprisingly deep mini-chess game.

  29. Eita porra! O cara entende tanto de xadrez que monta o tabuleiro errado. 😂 Inverteu a posição dos cavalos e dos bispos.

  30. Consider Reverse Chess: The winner is the first player to lose all their non-king pieces. If you can take a piece, you must.

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